Upstate Program: Landscapes & Spiritscapes

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Naturalist and educator Trish Kyzer presents a program called “One Wild Community: Finding our Place in the Wild” at the Landrum Depot in Landrum, SC

Upstate Field Trip: Oconee Falls CANCELLED

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Due to concern for everyone’ s health and safety,  this field trip has been cancelled.  We will try it again another time.

 

SCNPS Upstate Field Trip

Field Trip Event: Oconee Station falls and Nine Times Preserve

Location: Oconee and Pickens Counties

Date: Saturday March 21st, 2020

Leaders: Rick Huffman, Environmental Designer

Hike rating: Moderate

Costs: $15.00

SCNPS will sponsor an all-day field trip to historic Oconee Station Falls in Oconee County and an afternoon foray along the Eastatoe Creek and Nine Times Preserve areas. As a cove forest habitat, Oconee station falls is the premiere place for spring ephemerals such as Trillium, Foam Flower, Mayapple and more. The Eastatoe valley is rich with species and habitat diversity. Each hike is an easy walk and the waterfalls are wonderful.

Participants will meet 8:30 am at Holly Springs grocery at the intersection of SC 1178 and SC 11. We will carpool to the trail head parking on Oconee Station Road. Please email or call to reserve. Final itinerary will be sent a week prior the event. Please dress appropriately and bring lunch and water.

Our trip will be led by SCNPS founder, Rick Huffman. Rick has a rich knowledge of the geology, the natural history, native plants and the role they play in nature and for people. We are honored to provide this wonderful opportunity to share a day with Rick. Limit: 15 people, RSVP, Contact; Rick Huffman 864-901-7583 [email protected] Chris Sermons 864 992 6987 [email protected]

Rick Huffman

Upstate program: Round About Greenville and the Carolina Blue Ridge

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Join Pam Shucker and Bill Robertson as they share some of their favorite native plant destinations in the Greenville and Blue Ridge areas.  Bill Robinson is an award winning nature photographer.  Pam Shucker is a writer with a focus on nature.  Their new book, Round About Greenville and the Carolina Blue Ridge, combines Shucker’s essays and Robinson’s photographs.  Join them to learn about some of the most beautiful and serene places in the Upstate.

It all started when they were hiking with the Greenville Natural History Association. Pam Shucker and Bill Robertson, who have been hiking locally with that group for years, began bantering about collaborating on a book together, one that would include his photographs and her reflections.

“Because we so enjoy peaceful excursions into the many Upstate areas of natural beauty, we wanted to share our favorites by weaving a tapestry with words and photographs,” said Shucker, a retired teacher specializing in English and environmental education.

After several permutations, the book took shape and became titled Round About Greenville and the Carolina Blue Ridge. It’s expected to be published in time for the March meeting of SCNPS.

While the City of Greenville, at the foot of the Carolina Blue Ridge Mountains, has landed on  many “best of” lists and become known in the last decade or so for its downtown park around the falls, its varied restaurants, arts, vibrancy, and urban livability, Shucker and Robertson relish the region’s  peaceful natural places that, often, the media doesn’t mention much.

Among the gems they visit in their book are Oconee Station, Brasstown Creek Heritage Preserve, and the Poinsett Bridge.

The book was driven by the lovely images captured by Robertson. A longtime local photographer whose serene nature scenes both enliven and calm the halls of local medical facilities, churches, non-profits, and private homes, Robertson said the idea of the book was to escape the pavement and high energy of downtown Greenville and “focus on encouraging readers to discover more of the natural world.”

With short pieces written about a lot of different places, the book’s biggest challenge, said Shucker, was figuring out how to graphically integrate the photographs and words into a coherent whole. They found a solution in SCNPS’s very own design guru, Janie Marlow.

Printed by Four Colour Print Group out of Louisville, KY, Round About Greenville and the Carolina Blue Ridge can be purchased from Bill or Pam, may be available in some local book and gift stores, and can be ordered on Amazon.

“Bill and I each have friends and contacts who are eagerly awaiting this book that we have talked about for years,” said Shucker. “It is written for them, as well as to share our love of the natural environment we enjoy through weekly hiking and photography excursions. Many will buy it for Bill’s photography alone.”

This version of the book, said Shucker, had another catalyst. In a discussion she had at M. Judson Booksellers, the staff at the downtown Greenville bookstore said thy wish there were more titles to offer the tourists who ask for a book exploring the natural areas around the city. Sure, there are books about the area’s waterfalls or a guide to its hiking trails, or the history of Greenville, but nothing quite like what they created in Round About Greenville and the Carolina Blue Ridge.

At the March 17 meeting of SCNPS, the collaborators will select several places highlighted in their book to discuss by sharing anecdotes and related photographs. They also plan to talk about Heritage Preserves in the area and the state’s leading role in their birth. Native plant buffs should find plenty in the presentation to not only affirm their favorite hiking spots but to inspire them to lace up their trail shoes for a new adventure.

“Both Bill and I seek out wildflowers on our hiking experiences,” said Shucker. “And our group often plans spring hikes around significant wildflower areas.”

The program is free and open to all.

Upstate Field Trip: Pearson and Melrose Falls

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Join Naturalist Dan Whitten to view the spring ephemerals at Pearson and Melrose Falls in Saluda, NC.  These are beautiful and diverse plant ecosystems.  Spring ephemerals such as Trout Lily and Trillium will possibly be out early and it is an easy and great place to walk.

Meet at 8:30am at 1309 Grove Road in Greenville to carpool to Pearson Falls.  We will arrive there around 9:30 to meet Dan Whitten.  A final itinerary will be sent out a week prior to the outing. Please dress appropriately and bring lunch and water.  There is a $5 admission fee for Pearson Falls.

Dan Whitten is a renowned local naturalist.    He has a rich knowledge of native plants and the role they play in nature and folk culture.

Dan Whitten: Naturalist, trip leader

 

Limit is 15 people on the bus.  To RSVP, contact:  Rick Huffman 864-901-7583 or [email protected]

This listing is a correction from the date previously posted.

Upstate Program: Flower Color and Pollinators

February 18 @ 7:00 pm8:30 pm

Did you ever wonder how so much variation in flower color is maintained within species? Have your heard of ultraviolet ‘nectar guides’ on flowers?  On Tuesday, February 18, at Tri-County Technical College 7600 US 76, Pendleton in, Matt Koski, Assistant Professor at Clemson University, will discuss his research on flower color evolution. He will offer some explanations of the forces affecting floral evolution.

Koski grew up in Michigan and became fascinated with flowering plant diversity during field courses as an undergraduate at the University of Michigan. Later, he worked as a botany intern for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the high desert and Sierra Nevada, and then conducted field work on tropical forest community dynamics in Puerto Rico.  He discovered that flower color variations are due not only to pollinators, but to environmental factors as well.

DETAILED DIRECTIONS TO OCONEE HALL/ PARKER AUDITORIUM:
As you enter the campus at the traffic light (the south entrance), the driveway you want is to the left.  HOWEVER, you cannot turn left as you enter.  Please drive ahead to the first place you can make a u-turn and head back toward the traffic light.  Just before the light, turn right onto the one-way access road in front of the buildings.  You will pass Miller Hall, Anderson Hall  and Pickens Hall before coming to Oconee Hall on the right.  You may park in any of the student/faculty spots along the one-way drive.  There are also two  parking lots just past Oconee Hall.  Lot H-1 and Lot H-2 are available for us in the evening.   Please go to https://www.tctc.edu/media/2966/pendleton-campus-map.pdf and print a map of the campus.  There will be signs  marking the meeting entrance.

The program starts at 7:00 pm and is free and open to the public.  Arrive at 6:30 for socializing and refreshments.

Upstate Program: To the West and Back

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Upstate Program, Tuesday, Jan 21.  Join Dan and Sherrie Whitten as they take us:

To the West and Back – A Journey that Surpassed All Expectations!

Lewis & Clark and the Corps of Discovery? Well, uh, no, not that one. The journey we’ll hear about is a tad more recent, but it too was fueled by a quest for knowledge and filled with the thrill of discovery.

In 2019 Dan and Sherrie Whitten traveled through several western states, hiking, looking and learning.

 

There’s much plant life in the West that is totally unlike that of our lush green southern mountains and adjacent gentle hills, but there are a surprising number of plants that are jarringly similar.

For instance, Maianthemum stellatum / Smilacina stellata (Starry Solomon’s Plume, Starflower, or – the name that says it all! – Star-flowered False Solomon’s Seal)

is immediately recognizable. But wait… and you bring up in your mind’s eye an image of the plant you’re more familiar with, and ponder the ways in which the

two species differ: The western Starflower’s flowers are fewer, larger, and more star-like than those of our familiar False Solomon’s Seal / Eastern Solomon’s Plume (M. racemosum / S. racemosa), and they are borne in a raceme not a many-branched panicle.

Erythronium grandiflorum (Glacier Lily) is another look-alike. At first glance Glacier Lily looks like a robust version of our delicate Trout Lily (E. umbilicatum), but look close! Its leaves are not mottled and its flowers don’t have the purple backing. About it, Flora of North America says “This beautiful species is often very abundant in mountain meadows of western North America, especially in the Rocky Mountains, where it may form spectacular displays.”

Dan and Sherrie Whitten are both Master Naturalists as well as being active SCNPS members. If you’ve been on a field trip with them you can attest to their keen powers of observation, and it will be a pleasure to see western flora through their eyes!

Dan is a Past President and frequent field trip leader of SCNPS’s Upstate Chapter, Past President of the Upstate Master Naturalist Association, an instructor in the South Carolina Native Plants Certificate program, and tour boat captain with Jocassee Lake Tours. Sherrie is President of Friends of Jocassee and Past President of the Upstate Master Naturalist Association.

The program will be on Tuesday, January 21, 2020 at the Landrum Depot, 211 S 562, Landrum, SC 29356.  It begins at 7pm.  Arrive at 6:30 for socializing and refreshments.

  

Upstate Work Morning Blackwell HP CANCELLED

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CANCELLED FOR THE SECOND TIME DUE TO BAD WEATHER.  WILL RESCHEDULE AT A LATER DATE.

Jan 18 is rescheduled date

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) from a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve near Travelers Rest.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)  Thanks also to local residents who raised the alarm about the proposed development and the harm it threatened to the Preserve and the surrounding community.  They joined with conservation groups to fight the proposed development.

The work morning is now Saturday, January 18, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.

Come out to pull, pummel and pulverize some invasive privet.  The Bunched Arrowhead will thank you for “taking out”  the non-native competition!

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest and take Highway 25 north.   Just as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]

Blackwell HP work morning POSTPONED DUE TO RAIN

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NEW DATE IS SATURDAY, JAN 18    SAME TIME, SAME PLACE

Blackwell Heritage Preserve Work Morning Scheduled

Background

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) for a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve near Travelers Rest.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)  Thanks also to local residents who raised the alarm about the proposed development and the harm it threatened to the Preserve and the surrounding community.  They joined with conservation groups to fight the proposed development.

When and Where

The work morning will be Saturday, January 11, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.  Frank Holleman will lead the efforts.  The first work morning was a great success.  Come out and help finish the job.

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest; take Highway 25 north;, right as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]

Upstate Blackwell HP work morning RESCHEDULED

NEW DATE

Due to the very wet weather prediction for this coming Saturday, the Blackwell HP work morning has been postponed to the following Saturday, January 18.  All other information remains the same, as you can see below.
We hope you will come out on this new date to pull, pummel, and pulverize some Privet!  The Bunched Arrowhead will appreciate you for “taking out” the non-native competition.

THE DETAILS REMAIN THE SAME

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) from a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve near Travelers Rest.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)  Thanks also to local residents who raised the alarm about the proposed development and the harm it threatened to the Preserve and the surrounding community.  They joined with conservation groups to fight the proposed development.

The work morning is now Saturday, January 18, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.

DIRECTIONS

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest and take Highway 25 north.   Just as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]

Upstate Work Party, Nov. 9 “Privet Pull”

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Blackwell Heritage Preserve Work Morning Scheduled

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) for a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)

The work morning will be Saturday, November 9, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.

There may be follow-up work days later in November.

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest; take Highway 25 north;, right as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

 

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

 

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]