SCNPS Symposium: November 3rd-7th

SC Native Plant Society 2021 Symposium: Sustainability & Resilience

The South Carolina Native Plant Society invites you to our 2021 Symposium, hosted by the Lowcountry chapter, from November 3rd-7th!

We’ve got a great line-up of speakers on Wednesday 6:30-8:00 pm, Thursday 6:30-8:00 pm, and Saturday 10:00-10:30 AM, followed by the SCNPS Annual Meeting — all “Virtual” via Zoom and Facebook Live.

On Saturday afternoon we’ll transition to in-person events in Charleston, with outdoor rotating learning sessions and a social.

And on Sunday morning we’ll wrap up with a bang with a selection of three engaging field trips!

For more information about these talks and in-person activities, see the 2021 Symposium event page.  We hope to see you online and/or in person this week!

April 2021 Upstate General Meeting

Tricia Kyzer
SC Master Naturalist

One Wild Community; Finding Our Place in the Wild

Speaker:  Tricia Kyzer

 

Take a photographic journey with naturalist and environmental educator Tricia Kyzer exploring how ecological communities we live in can shape us and become a part of our story and how we can find our place in our wild communities.

About:  Tricia Kyzer holds a BA in Elementary Education from North Greenville University and is a Statewide SC Master Naturalist. For the past 15 years Tricia has worked with people of all ages leading them into making their own connections to our wild places.

Watch the Video

Upstate Chapter March General Meeting

Downy Gentain (Gentian puberulenta)
Photo by Laura Moses

‘Restoring Two South Carolina Bays with Rare Plants’, by Lisa Lord and Sudie Thomas

Carolina Bays are a fascinating and vital phenomenon of the Atlantic Seaboard, mainly found along the boundary between North and South Carolina. These bays were discovered in the 1930s when aerial photography came into existence. Oval in shape and ranging in length from a few hundred feet to up to 6 miles these depressions have been found to be valuable habitat for our most rare plants and animals. Estimates reveal that at one time as many as 2.5 million Carolina Bays existed.  Unfortunately, most have been drained or otherwise obliterated by agriculture and/or logging.  How they came into existence, all the same shape and positioned in the same northwest to southeast configuration, is still debated.

In 2018 SCNPS was able to acquire the Kingburg Bay located in Florence County.  The Nature Conservancy acquired and passed on to the Society the Lisa Matthews Bay located in Bamberg County.

Lisa Lord, a certified Wildlife Biologist, is presently the Conservation Program Director for the Longleaf Alliance and she is also Chair of the Kingsburg Bay for the SCNPS.  Sudie Thomas, Chair of the Lisa Matthews Bay is also a Wildlife Biologist at the Natural Resources Conservation Service.  Both are longtime members of the SCNPS and have been involved have been involved in numerous land management, restoration, and conservation projects.

Watch the Video

Midlands Fall Native Plant Sale, Oct 29 & 30

The Midlands Chapter is excited to host its first native plant sale, and honored to partner with Historic Columbia Foundation during their fall sale.
Historic Columbia is actively working to replant many of its gardens with native species. They are generously sharing space at the Robert Mills House with SCNPS for this sale, so shoppers can select from both groups’ plant offerings.

See a list of plants available for sale.

Location: Robert Mills House, 1616 Blanding St., Columbia (Enter parking lot on Henderson Street between Blanding and Taylor or park on nearby streets)

Friday, October 29:
9:00-9:30   volunteers only
9:30 – 10:00   members and volunteers
10:00 am – 4:00 pm   general public

Saturday, October 30: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm

Note: Thursday, October 28 is reserved for Historic Columbia Foundation members only. To join, visit https://www.historiccolumbia.org/support/membership

Please plan to pay by credit card and mask up when you can’t stay 6 feet apart. Bring a cart or wagon if you think you might be tempted to get more than two hands can hold.
For questions or if you’re interested in volunteering (and getting an early opportunity to shop) please contact [email protected].

September 2021 Annual Meeting

Featured speaker: Doug Tallamy, author of “Nature’s Best Hope”

Douglas Tallamy’s first book, Bringing Nature Home, awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. His sequel to Bringing Nature Home is Nature’s Best Hope. His presentation to the SCNPS in September 2021 was based on this book in which he outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. Douglas Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. He has taught courses in insect taxonomy, behavioral ecology, humans and nature, and insect ecology.

If you weren’t able to attend the Zoom session, you can watch the video here.

Retail nurseries featuring native plants — Updated today!

The SCNPS Native Plant Nursery List features nurseries, garden centers, and seasonal non-profit plant sales that emphasize native plants, organized by region.

If you would like to bookmark this list for future reference, we recommend bookmarking this page instead (and scrolling down to the “Retail Nurseries in South Carolina” section at the bottom of the page) to ensure that you’re always viewing the most up-to-date version of this resource.

 

Upstate Meeting: Doug Tallamy : Nature’s Best Hope

Upstate Annual Meeting: Doug Tallamy Special Speaker

September 21 @ 6:30 pm8:00 pm

September 21st, 6:30 pm
Upstate Annual Meeting: Nature’s Best Hope 
Recent headlines about global insect declines and three billion fewer birds in North America are a bleak reality check about how ineffective our current landscape designs have been at sustaining the plants and animals that sustain us. Such losses are not an option if we wish to continue our current standard of living on Planet Earth. The good news is that none of this is inevitable.

Tallamy will discuss simple steps that each of us can- and must take to reverse declining biodiversity, why we must change our adversarial relationship with nature to a collaborative one, and why we, ourselves, are nature’s best hope.

Douglas Tallamy’s first book, Bringing Nature Home, awakened thousands of readers to an urgent situation: wildlife populations are in decline because the native plants they depend on are fast disappearing. His solution? Plant more natives. His sequel to Bringing Nature Home is Nature’s Best Hope.His presentation to the SCNPS on September 21, 2021 will be based on this book in which he outlines his vision for a grassroots approach to conservation. Douglas Tallamy is a professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. He has taught courses in insect taxonomy, behavioral ecology, humans and nature, and insect ecology.

                                 Join the meeting at:
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86538607784?pwd=QVcxSGQ4UzlQUFlrbTNvanFrQ0k5Zz09 

Meeting ID: 865 3860 7784
Passcode: 114231

The zoom meeting will open at 6:30 for socializing.  At 7pm there will be a short business meeting followed by Dr. Tallamy’s talk.

Greenville County Land Development Regulation Update

Photo by Charles C. Ebbets (1932)

By Doug Lockard 04Sept21

With 16% growth over the past 10 years, and a prediction of 150,000 additional people by 2040, Greenville County has some significant challenges facing it.  That balance between economics and conservation that makes Greenville such a desirable place to live will only become more difficult to attain if action isn’t taken now.  Our community needs leaders to step up and steer things in a positive direction, and we, the people, must speak up to prevent the irrevocable loss of natural land and assure conservation of our quality of life for generations to come.

In 2018, Greenville County enacted the Land and Development Regulation ‘Article 3.1’ which was well-intended to provide address the lack of rural conservation design standards in the then current land development regulations.  Developers, landowners and Councilmembers have been fighting over it ever since.

The most recent version of a revised Article 3.1 passed in June with a 7-5 vote by the Greenville County Council weakened the regulation, allow developers to set aside even less than 30% of land in new subdivisions as was recommended by the county’s planning staff.  It creates a sliding scale ranging from no open-space requirement for subdivisions with 2-acre lots to a 25% open-space requirement in new housing communities with half-acre lots.  It also removed a requirement for developers to widen county roads near new subdivisions.

So why is this important to the SCNPS?  Preventing the loss of native habitat that is critical to our wildlife, our rare and threatened native plants, and our own quality of life is part of the SCNPS mission statement.

The next step will be a public hearing at County Council on a date to be determined. What can you do?  First, be aware of the issues and then communicate with your elected representatives to let them know what you think.

Voting in favor of the Article 3.1 changes:  Ernest Fant, Willis Meadows, Mike Barnes, Chris Harrison, Xanthene Norris, Steve Shaw and Stan Tzouvelekas.  Dissenting votes were cast by Lynn Ballard, Joe Dill, Dan Tripp, Butch Kirven and Liz Seman.