Privet Pull at Blackwell HP Jan 11, 2020

Blackwell Heritage Preserve Work Morning Scheduled

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) for a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve near Travelers Rest.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)  Thanks also to local residents who raised the alarm about the proposed development and the harm it threatened to the Preserve and the surrounding community.  They joined with conservation groups to fight the proposed development.

 

The work morning will be Saturday, January 11, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest; take Highway 25 north;, right as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]

Upstate Holiday Party

Let us make merry and enjoy an evening of good fellowship with SCNPS friends.  Join the Upstate chapter on Tuesday, Dec. 10  (not the usual meeting night) at 7pm.  Everyone will bring finger food to share.  NPS will have the beverages.  The fun starts at 7pm at Camperdown Academy at 65 Verdae Commons Drive, Greenville.   Verdae Commons Dr. is opposite Henderson Road at Laurens Rd and across from Bradshaw Mazda. (Please note the address is Verdae Commons Dr., not Verdae Blvd.) From Laurens Road, turn onto Verdae Commons Drive at the stop light at Henderson/Verdae Commons Roads. Follow Verdae Commons about 1/8 mile to the school on the left side.

The book table will be there along with friends old and not-yet-made.

You are also invited to bring a “mystery” seed, seed pod or other native plant part for others to try to identify.  Please mount your item on a cardboard, paper or other backing.  Attach a piece of folded over paper.  On the inside of the fold, give the common and scientific name of the native plant and also your name.  This is not a contest, but it will be fun to see how many you can ID!

Come out to help celebrate the season.  Hope to see you there.

Field Trip to Station Cove Falls

Saturday, March 23  8am to 2pm     Leaders:  Rick Huffman and Dan Whitten

Join Rick and Dan on this 3/4 mile easy trek into Sumpter National Forest.  Station Cove Falls is the premier cove forest habitat in the Upstate to see Spring ephemerals. such at Trilliums, Mayapples, and much more.  A grand reward at the trail’s end is Station Cove Falls!

Rick Huffman says,

“Station Cove Falls (also called Oconee Station Falls) is an ancient, timeless place where geology and plate tectonics have shaped and formed this land into what we see today.  Each year the pilgrimage begins early in February and March to see the promise of a rich bounty of botanical treasures.

Few realize how botanically old this place is or understand the role of amphibolite (Mineral) plays in making this a botanical wonderland. Some have said it’s the best Cove Forest habitat on the Eastern Seaboard, some in authority have claimed this place to be the most ancient place for plants on the planet.  From Blood Root, Trilliums, Mayapple, Violets, Rue Anemone, Hepatica and wood betony, we find ourselves in reverence of this place. We find salvation from our urban hectic lives and we feel at home. I have called this place ‘The Church’. It’s where I go to find that peace, that serenity, the sense of promise and renewal.  The SCNPS has long held this place sacred and we go there on March 23rd to experience the wonders of creation and of time and place. Joins us as we make the journey back in time to find our peace today.”

You don’t want to miss this trip!!  The outing will also include a excursion along the Estatoe at Nine Times Nature Preserve to view many more spring wildflowers.

Meet at 8am at Holly Springs Store, 6491 SC-11, Pickens, SC 29671, at the intersection of Hwy. 11 and SC 178.   Bring water, lunch/snacks and dress in field clothing and hiking or sturdy walking shoes.  A hiking stick is optional.

To sign up contact Rick Huffman at : <[email protected]>or call (864) 901-7583.  Please include a cell phone number for last minute information.  Please include the number in your party, whether or not you are willing to be a driver for carpooling, and how many riders you could accommodate.

Upstate Meeting: Sustainable Landscaping with Rick Huffman

On Tuesday, January 15 at 7:00pm at Landrum Depot in Landrum, SC, Rick Huffman will speak on Sustainable Landscape Applications and Applied Ecology. Rick Huffman is principal and founder of Earth Design Inc. with over 30 years of experience in, landscape design, horticulture, bio-engineering, and ecology.  Come out an learn how to apply the principles of sustainable landscaping to your property.  There is a way to retire the lawn mower, avoid expensive polluting fertilizers, and build a beautiful sustainable landscape on your property.

The program is free and open to the public.   Arrive at 6:30 for socializing and refreshments.  Landrum Depot is at 211 S 562, Landrum, SC 29356.

Upstate Native Plant Sale, April 22

The Native Plant Society Upstate Spring Native Plant Sale is just 10 days away on Saturday, April 22.
The sale runs from 9am to 1pm at Conestee Park, 840 Mauldin Road in Greenville.  There is a good selection of native trees, shrubs, perennial wildflowers, ferns, and vines, and a few grasses.

On the SCNPS website you can now find a list of the plants that will be available.  Go to www.scnps.org.  Click on Activities/calendar.  The go to April 22 and click on the sale.  There you will find all the details about the sale including a link to the inventory list.  Here is a link to take you directly to the page:    https://scnps.org/event/upstate-native-plant-sale-2017.  Check out the inventory and make a list of plants you want for YOUR property.  This list does NOT include what our guest vendors will have.

Seven guest vendors will be on hand with their plants and plant products.  They are Carnivorous Plants  (Jeff Miller), Carolina Wild (Greg and Christina Bruner), Earthen organics (Kristen Beigay), Natives, By George (Betsy George), Natives Plus Nursery (Richard Davis), Natures Organics (David Senn), and Wildside Garden (Joe Townsend).

There will be advisors on hand to help you select plants.  We will also have a table of wonderful books about native plants and gardening with them.   Dr. Jan Haldeman will be there to discuss the issues of exotic invasive plants and to show samples.  Check, cash and credit cards are accepted.

Conestee Park is just a three minute drive south from the Mauldin Road exit from I-85.  It is near the old Braves Stadium.

 

Upstate: Nominations for Board of Directors

The Nominating Committee of the Upstate Chapter of SC NPS has proposed the following slate of Board members, whose term of office would begin on January 1, 2017:

President           Dan Whitten
Vice President   Virginia Meador
Secretary            Susan Lochridge
Treasurer            Jim Corey

According to the Upstate Chapter Bylaws, nominations may be submitted from the general membership through October 31, 2016.  If no other nominations are received from the general membership, the slate of officers presented by the nominating committee will be declared elected on November 1, 2017.  Nominations may be submitted to [email protected] or 864-578-7807.

Nominating Committee:
Bill Sharpton, Chairman
Steve Holding
Cheryl Holding
Ron Crowley

 

Upstate Home & Garden Show

The Upstate Chapter participated in the Southern Home & Garden Show in Greenville March 4-6.  Steve Marlow worked his usual magic in pulling together a great booth filled with information sheets and a lovely selection of native plants provided by Carolina Wild (Anderson, SC).  SC NPS provided 26 volunteers for a total of 23 hours of Show time, and the volunteers collected 44 names of folks interested in native plants.  The new “Wild Plants on the Rabbit” brochure was especially popular with booth visitors.

Steve Marlow, Rick Huffman, Dan Whitten (Upstate Chapter President)

Steve Marlow, Rick Huffman, Dan Whitten (Upstate Chapter President)

Bill Stringer, Bill Sharpton

Bill Stringer, Bill Sharpton

Jo Anne Connor, Dan Whitten, Guests

Jo Anne Connor, Dan Whitten, Guests

 

A guide to the plants on the Swamp Rabbit Trail

SRT_frontcover_150The South Carolina Native Plant Society
is excited to announce Wild Plants on the Rabbit,
a new, pocket-sized brochure
about the native and naturalized plants
growing along the Swamp Rabbit Trail.

The Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail runs nearly 20 miles, from above the town of Travelers Rest into the heart of Greenville, until terminating in Lake Conestee Nature Park. For much of its length following the Reedy River or the route of an old railroad, the Trail is widely praised — both for its role in encouraging healthful exercise and for the economic boon it’s been to the community.

Other, less obvious, benefits are its value as a wildlife corridor and as an outdoor classroom. The Trail adjoins woodlands and wetlands, gardens and gullies, and it is a convenient place for people to get up close and personal with plants that are not in a garden, home landscape, or park, and that are more than just a blur seen out the car window.

Sharp eyes may spot Trillium, Bloodroot, Cardinal Flower, Swamp Milkweed, Downy Lobelia, a handful of Sunflowers species, or even the small white flowers of the rare, federally protected Bunched Arrowhead. Over 100 different plant species are featured in the brochure, with a photograph and a short description, and a map of the Trail is included for reference. Trail users are encouraged to use the brochure as a checklist, checking off plants as they spot them.

A common misconception is that if a plant is growing “wild” it must be native to this area, but many of the plants encountered on the Trail were brought here from other continents, either intentionally or by accident. Many exotic plants have established themselves along the Trail, disrupting naturally occurring native plant communities.

The brochure provides links to a more complete plant inventory. SCNPS members have currently documented almost 400 species growing wild on the Trail, and the list is far from complete. If Trail users see a plant on the Trail that they cannot find in the brochure or in this list, the Society’s website offers a service where they can submit their own photos for identification.

Wild Plants on the Rabbit brochures are free and available at Upstate Chapter events (including the April 16th Native Plant Sale at Conestee Park!) and at other outlets listed at this link. (To download a reduced version in PDF format, click here.)

 

We value our sponsors
who help make projects like this possible!

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Upstate Plant Rescue and Planting

Twin Chimneys 2016-01-30

Bill Sharpton led a group of 13 energetic volunteers in rescuing Christmas ferns (Polystichum acrostichoides) from a soon-to-be covered site at Twin Chimneys Landfill in southern Greenville County on Saturday, January 30, 2016.

After lunch at a nearby restaurant, the group headed to a section of the Swamp Rabbit Trail near the Greenville Zoo to plant the rescued ferns. The weather cooperated (high in the low 60’s), and lots of families were visiting the zoo to take advantage of a beautiful winter day in Upstate South Carolina.

This particular section of the Swamp Rabbit Trail is in Cleveland Park and has been a special project for the Upstate Chapter since 2013, when SCNPS member Bette Thern noticed some interesting wildflowers there. Little Sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum), Bloodroot (Sanguinaria canadensis) and Bellwort (Uvularia perfoliata) were growing in prime position right beside the trail, but nearly smothered by a heavy blanket of English Ivy and other invasives. Several Silverbell trees (Halesia tetraptera) decorated the lower canopy.

The site was shown to Scott Drayton of City of Greenville Parks and Recreation. Scott committed Greenville P&R to remove the invasives and underbrush if SCNPS members would mark the wildflowers and Silverbell saplings. SCNPS continues to monitor the site and man occasional workdays.

To visit, park in the lower Zoo parking lot, walk past the Vietnam Memorial and cross the river at the double bridges. The site is located at the end and slightly to the right of the crossing just across the asphalt walking path.