Upstate program: Native Cane restoration

Native Cane Making a Comeback!

The November 19 meeting of the Native Plant Society presents Buzz Williams sharing his dream and project for restoring Native Cane in the Upstate. The program is set for 7pm at Tri-County Technical College, in Parker Auditorium next to Oconee Hall.  The College is at 7600 US 76, Pendleton, SC.   Enter Marshall Parker Auditorium via Oconee Hall.  As you enter the campus at the traffic light (the south entrance), the driveway you want is to the left.  HOWEVER, you cannot turn left as you enter.  Please drive ahead to the first place you can make a u-turn and head back toward the traffic light.  Just before the light, turn right onto the one-way access road in front of the buildings.  You will pass Miller Hall, Anderson Hall  and Pickens Hall before coming to Oconee Hall on the right.  You may park in any of the student/faculty spots along the one-way drive.  There are also two  parking lots just past Oconee Hall.  Lot H-1 and Lot H-2 available for us in the evening.   Please go to https://www.tctc.edu/media/2966/pendleton-campus-map.pdf and print a map of the campus.  There will be signs  marking the building entrance.

Native Cane once covered 10 million acres in the Southern Appalachians and Piedmont areas.

Accounts from early explorer and settlers in South Carolina mention great “cane breaks”, large stands of bamboo-like cane (Arundinaria gigantea) along rivers and streams.  Native cane once grew in expansive thickets along the Reedy River in Greenville County, too. “We know this,” said Williams, “because the Revolutionary War battle known as the Battle of the Great Cane Break was fought on the banks of the Reedy River near Simpsonville. Less than 2% if that expanse of cane remains.  Buzz Williams has a plan to restore it in Oconee County.

Who is Buzz Williams?

The founder and former executive director of the Chattooga Conservancy, Williams is heavily involved in the non-profit’s Native Cane Restoration Project, a collaborative cost-share effort with the USDA Forest Service. The project goal is to restore 29 acres of native cane located on the Oconee County side of the SC Highway 28 bridge that crosses the rollicking Chattooga River into Georgia.

Native cane was once used extensively by native people for building material, baskets, flutes, blow guns, arrow shafts, and sleeping mats,” said Williams. “I became interested in native cane because I make white-oak baskets and (then) became interested in the history of Cherokee cane basketmaking.”

At the Nov. 19 meeting, Williams will talk about the restoration efforts by the Chattooga Conservancy and its project partners – including the Eastern Band of the Cherokee, RTCAR (Revitalization of Traditional Cherokee Artisan Resources), master gardeners, and volunteers.  So far they have restored five acres.

The program is free and open to the public.  For more information, go to https://www.scnps.org.

Upstate Privet Pull at Blackwell Heritage Preserve

Blackwell Heritage Preserve Work Morning Scheduled

NPS along with and Naturaland Trust is holding a work morning to remove invasive plants (Privet mostly) for a newly acquired addition to Blackwell Heritage Preserve near Travelers Rest.  The new property contains two federally protected plant species. It was saved from development through cumulative collaborative efforts by Upstate Forever, the Southern Environmental Law Center, SC Native Plant Society, Greenville County, Naturaland Trust, the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Heritage Trust Program of the SC Department of Natural Resources.  (Details at https://www.upstateforever.org/news/ultrarare-plant-habitat-protected-in-travelers-rest)

The work morning will be Saturday, November 9, 9am to no later than Noon.  Wear long sleeves and long pants.  There is poison ivy on the site.  Wear gloves, bring shovels or mattocks as we will be pulling up and digging up privet.  Some of the ground is damp, so wear shoes or boots that you can get muddy.

There may be follow-up work days later in November.

Directions:  From Greenville and points south:  Head up Poinsett Highway towards Travelers Rest; take Highway 25 north;, right as you leave the Travelers Rest business district, turn right on Blue Ridge Drive. Continue up Blue Ridge Drive.  The parking area will be on the left in the pasture on the Heritage Trust property, marked with blue paint on the trees on the left side of the road.

 

From north of Travelers Rest:  take Highway 25 south and turn left on Blue Ridge Drive, before entering the Travelers Rest business district.  Then follow directions above.

 

To sign-up for the work party and receive any last-minute information, please contact Virginia Meador at [email protected]

Upstate Fall Native Plant Sale

The Upstate Fall Greenhouse Native Plant Sale is just around the corner!! Once you flip your calendar to October, the sale is right there, boom, on Friday, October 4, from 3pm to 7pm and Saturday, October 5, from 9am to 2pm. Just now, the soil is cooling, the temperatures are falling.  October and November are the best times to plant the trees, shrubs, perennial wildflowers, ferns, vines and grasses that will be available at the sale.  Their roots can sink into the soil and develop without the stress of summer heat.  The plants will be ready to come back strongly in the spring.  Look around your landscape and make a plan of what you want popping up to delight you next spring!  We have several thousand plants available.

180 lakewood Dr., Greenville, SC

List of Plants Available

For a list of plants available, go to https://scnps.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/UpstateFallSalePlantList_091219.pdf.   You can also find the list at the www.scnps.org.  Under the activities heading, click on calendar.  Then click on the date of October 4 where there is a link to the plant list.
The NPS greenhouse is at 180 Lakewood Drive, Greenville, about 1 mile from Conestee Park. Look for the NPS Greenhouse sign on the mailbox.  This is a low-keyed, relaxed sale, so come and browse.  Cash, check and credit accepted.  The greenhouse is on private property with limited parking.  Please carpool if possible. Call Miller Putnam at (864) 325-9700 if you have questions.

Upstate Program: Jim Welch from Nature Scene

Jim Welch presents “Scenes from Nature Scene TV show”

The October 15 Native Plant Society meeting features Jim Welch, co-host of the long-running tv program Nature Scene on PSB.  Dr. Welch will share experiences from his 20-year run, along with Rudy Mancke, creating Nature Scene.  They filmed episodes throughout the USA and around the world.  The program will be held at Landrum Depot, 211 North Trade Ave, Landrum SC, starting at 7pm.   The event is free and open to the public.

ABOUT JIM WELCH

Jim Welch grew up in Vermont and recalls tales of sugaring there. One of the ETV shows with Rudy Mancke (who grew up in Spartanburg) was filmed at his old family farm in Vermont. Others were widespread, throughout the United States and to Lake Baikal in Siberia, to Chernobyl, Ukraine, and to the dry provinces and rain forests of Costa Rica.  From those travels and filming Jim still has artifacts and tales, often amusing, of behind-the-scenes mishaps and adventures that never made it into the TV programs.

Welch graduated from Alan Hancock College in Santa Maria, California.  He  went on to study broadcasting at UCLA, the University of Miami and the University of Hawaii. He received the Doctor of Science degree from Lander University in 1998.  He worked in Columbia for many years as a news anchor for WISTV. Later he moved to SCETV as Director of Programming and there produced and hosted a number of series before deciding to devote himself to NATURE SCENE.

Each show was a walk on the beach or through the woods.  Welch and Mancke talked about the animals and plants they encountered.  It gave Welch a chance to observe nature up close and to share it with the audience. Nature lovers loved the show, and the duo did 300 episodes.  Now retired,  Jim Welch lives with his wife on long-held family property in North Carolina where he still walks the trails and enjoys nature.

Upstate/Piedmont Field Trip

Saturday, October 12, 8:00am till ? (all day)Field Trip: Rock Hill Blackjacks HP in York County.

Leaders: Dr. Bill Stringer & Dan Whitten.  Hike: Moderate,   Costs: $25.00 per person for Upstate Chapter van riders.

The Rock Hill Blackjacks Heritage Preserve covers 291 acres at the edge of the city of Rock Hill in York County. The Preserve is a blend of prairie-like meadows, wetlands, upland swamps, wildflowers, wildlife and forests, including the blackjack oaks. The site has Schweinitz Sunflower (Helianthus schweinitzii), a globally rare species. There is also a significant population of Prairie dock (Silphium terebinthinaceum), very common in the midwestern tallgrass prairies, but rare in the eastern states. As a glance back in time, this small area is all that remains of the once widespread prairie system in South Carolina. This surviving remnant prairie is a result of uncommon soil conditions based on localized parent material geology.

SCNPS will sponsor an all-day field trip to the Piedmont Prairie. Upstate chapter participants will meet 8 am at 1309 Grove Road in Greenville. SCNPS will provide a 15-passenger van and others may carpool to the site. However, parking is limited. We plan to arrive around 10 am to the preserve. Final itinerary will be sent prior the event. Please dress appropriately and bring lunch and water.

Our trip will be led by Bill Stringer, retired agronomist, and Dan Whitten, naturalist. The Piedmont Chapter is our host chapter. We are honored to provide this wonderful opportunity to share this unique remnant.

To reserve a space, contact Rick Huffman 864-901-7583 <[email protected]>

Dan Whitten, Naturalist

Upstate Native Plant Sale

The Upstate Fall Greenhouse Native Plant Sale is just around the corner!! Once you flip your calendar to October, the sale is right there, boom, on Friday, October 4, from 3pm to 7pm and Saturday, October 5, from 9am to 2pm.  Just now, the soil is cooling, the temperatures are falling.  October and November are the best times to plant the trees, shrubs, perennial wildflowers, ferns, vines and grasses that will be available at the sale.  Their roots can sink into the soil and develop without the stress of summer heat and drought.  The plants will be ready to come back strongly in the spring.  Look around your landscape and make a plan of what you want popping up to delight you next spring!  We have several thousand plants available.

For a list of plants available, after Sept. 20 go to www.scnps.org.  Under the activities heading, click on calendar.  Then click on the date of October 4 where there will be a link to the plant list.

The NPS greenhouse is at 180 Lakewood Drive, Greenville, about 1 mile from Conestee Park. Look for the NPS Greenhouse sign on the mailbox.  This is a low-keyed, relaxed sale, so come and browse.  Cash, check and credit accepted.  The greenhouse is on private property with limited parking.  Please carpool if possible and bring along a friend. Call Miller Putnam at (864) 325-9700 if you have questions or would like to stop by the greenhouse between now and the sale.

Rudy Mancke at Upstate Annual Meeting

Rudy Mancke at Upstate Annual Meeting

September 17 @ 7:00 pm9:30 pm

Rudy Mancke highlights the Upstate Annual meeting on Tuesday, September 17.  He will share some of his favorite moments as a Naturalist. Mancke, known to generations of South Carolinians as the co-host of Nature Scene on South Carolina ETV,  will share his stories, memories, and wit at the annual meeting.  The event will be held in Greenville at Camperdown Academy. The address is 65 Verdae Commons Drive. (not Verdae Drive)  There will be refreshments after the program and a chance to speak with Mancke.

Mancke is the current host of Nature Notes on SC Public Radio and SCETV.  He teaches at the University of South Carolina at Columbia.  The event is free and open to the public.

Nature of Summer with Rudy Mancke

Charleston Green Drinks Resources

Here are some helpful documents the Lowcountry Chapter of SCNPS provided at the Charleston Green Drinks event on June 18.  The link to download each document is below the preview window.

For guidance on what to plant in your yard in coastal SC:

For guidance about what NOT to plant:

For more information about exotic invasive plants, please contact the SC Exotic Pest Plant Council:

https://www.se-eppc.org/southcarolina/invasivePlants.cfm

Upstate Program: What Happened to the Bobwhite Quail?

Bobwhite Quail, an iconic favorite of both hunters and bird watchers are increasingly rare in South Carolina.  Michael Small, biologist, will discuss the decline of Quail at the July Native Plant Society meeting and offer suggestions to reverse the trend.  The meeting  is set for Tuesday, July 16 at 7pm at Landrum Depot, 211 Trade Avenue, Landrum, SC.

The dramatic decline in Quail populations is linked to changes in land use.  For much of the 20th century, the Southeast was a diverse mosaic of habitats.  These habitats included row crops, native grasslands, fallow fields and forest, ideal areas for Quail.  However, land use has changed.  Vacant land is being rapidly developed.  Farming practices have eliminated many of the “edge” areas that quail prefer.

Michael Small, a biologist with the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, will offer suggestions for landowners to increase the amount of ideal Quail habitat on their property.  Habitat edge, where a field meets a forest, pond or fence row is often better for quail than a uniform habitat.  To enhance the “edge effect”, large fields can be divided into several small fields.  This allows  more buffer areas between fields.  Good quality edge habitat includes gradual transition zones with diverse plant communities of different types and heights, including native grasses, legumes and shrubs.  Often, some fairly simple steps, like changing mowing schedules, can get things going in the right direction of Quail.

Sustainable Landscaping

The Tuesday, June 18th, Upstate meeting features Dr. Ellen Vincent.  She will speak on “Native Plants in the Sustainable Landscape,” with an emphasis on using the right plant in the right place. Sustainable landscapes, in general, are ecologically more stable than traditional landscapes and require less inputs such as water, fertilizers and pesticides. Because native plants offer ecosystem benefits that contribute to a healthy multi-layered environment, it would seem that native plants and sustainable landscapes would go hand in hand. They often do; however, just planting natives doesn’t automatically make a landscape sustainable.

Come out to hear Dr. Vincent’s guidance and principles for using the right plant in the right place.

The program will be held at Camperdown Academy at 65 Verdae Commons Dr, (not Verdae Blvd) Greenville.  Verdae Commons Dr. is a fairly new road and may not show up on older map programs.  If you are on Laurens Road, (276) heading north from I-85, cross E. Parkins Mill/ Verdae Blvd.  The next intersection will be Henderson Rd.on left and Verdae Commons Dr. on the right. It is across Laurens Road from Bradshaw Mazda at 2512 Laurens Road.  Turn right on Verdae Commons and go about 1/8 mile.  Look for Camperdown Academy on the left.  If you are heading south on Laurens Road from Pleasantburg Rd, pass Haywood Rd and Woodruff Rd on your left.  Look for Bradshaw Mazda on the right.  Immediately see Henderson Rd. on the right/Verdae Commons Dr. on the left.   Turn left onto Verdae Commons Dr.   Go about 1/8 mile and look for Camperdown Academy on the left.  Look for the SCNPS event signs.  You can also put Bradshaw Mazda 2512 Laurens Rd in your map program and that will take you very close to the correct intersection.

The program starts at 7pm.  Arrive at 6:30 for socializing and refreshments.