BANNED in South Carolina!

Fig Buttercup, also known as Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna/Ranunculus ficaria), has recently been added to South Carolina’s list of regulated pest plant species

Three species have recently been added to South Carolina’s list of regulated pest plant species (also referred to as the Plant Pest List):

  • Fig Buttercup, also known as Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna/Ranunculus ficaria),
  • Crested Floating Heart (Nymphoides cristata), and
  • Yellow Floating Heart (Nymphoides peltata).

It is illegal to buy, sell, trade, or possess a regulated pest plant species within the state; if it is on your property you are legally obligated to remove it.

For the three most recently added species, these regulations are now in effect.

The state plant pest list is maintained and enforced by Clemson University’s Department of Plant Industry and can be viewed at this link: www.clemson.edu/invasives

Many of the plants on this list are not familiar to us — and for that we can be grateful. Regulators on the state or federal level have seen how they have behaved in other areas and managed to keep them (mostly) out of our state.

On the other hand, familiar invasive thugs such as Kudzu, Chinese Privet, Tree of Heaven, and Japanese Stiltgrass are noticeably absent from the list. Why? Because by the time their invasiveness was acknowledged, they were so widespread that banning would no longer be effective. It would be like closing the barn door after the cows have gotten out (or in this case, in).

This underscores the importance of timely regulations and knowledgeable and alert regulators — as well as the importance of each of us paying attention to the identity of the plants we see taking up residence in our green spaces! Learn more at the Upstate Chapter’s upcoming meeting in Landrum on Oct 17.

Fig Buttercup, also known as Lesser Celandine (Ficaria verna/Ranunculus ficaria), has recently been added to South Carolina’s list of regulated pest plant speciesFig Buttercup is an early-blooming perennial with showy yellow flowers, which gardeners sometimes confuse with the native Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris). Recently, its behavior has transitioned to that of an aggressive invasive species that threatens bottomlands throughout its adopted range.
Its 2013 discovery at Lake Conestee Nature Park was the first documentation of its naturalizing in South Carolina; since then, SCNPS volunteers have worked every year to eradicate it there and in the waterways upstream. An infestation has also been found in York County.

Learn more at http://scnps.org/citizen-science-invasive-fig-buttercup/

Yellow Floating Heart (Nymphoides peltata) has recently been added to South Carolina’s list of regulated pest plant speciesCrested Floating Heart (Nymphoides cristata) and Yellow Floating Heart (N. peltata) are aquatic plants often found in water gardens, which are the source of many of the introductions.

 

Crested Floating Heart (Nymphoides cristata) has recently been added to South Carolina’s list of regulated pest plant species

Photo by Keith Bradley.

Crested Floating Heart was first detected at the southeastern end of Lake Marion (Orangeburg County) in 2006, which was the first time that free-living populations of the plant had been found in the US outside of Florida. It has spread throughout the Santee Cooper Lake System (Lake Marion and Lake Moultrie) with a total of some 6,000 acres infested as of October 2012. If not controlled, biologists estimate that it could ultimately infest as much as 40% of the 160,000-acre lake system.

Learn more at www.invasive.org/publications/CrestedFloatingHeart.pdf

 

 

Upstate: Lake Conestee Nature Park, the invasive fig buttercup, and you

Field trip/workshop leaders: Bill Stringer and Janie Marlow

Help us Corral the Invasive Fig Buttercup Before It’s Too Late!

Fig buttercup (Ficaria verna) has recently been reported in SC, in our very own Lake Conestee Nature Park. A little bit of smart scouting has since turned it up in Rock Hill and another site in Greenville. We’ve learned some things about how it spreads, and it’s downright scary. Because of this and the way it reproduces, it has the potential to crush the spring wildflower communities of our floodplains. We are concerned that it may be establishing beachheads along other streams and tributaries in the state,
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This is important. To learn more, please watch the video at
http://scnps.org/education/citizen-science-invasive-fig-buttercup/

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and we need lots of trained, alert eyeballs looking for fig buttercup whenever you take Rover for a walk, when you go out birdwatching, or along your favorite jogging trail. On this hike we will show you important ID characteristics, how the thing reproduces and spreads, and the kind of places where it is likely to be found. By the end of the trip you will be in an excellent position to help us scout this aggressive invasive plant.

If you would like to participate in this field trip/workshop, email [email protected]. Please include your cell phone number. Bring water and snack if needed and wear shoes suitable for muddy walking. Meet at the park office at 601 Fork Shoals Road, Greenville, SC 29605. Go to http://lakeconesteenaturepark.com/ for a park map.

National Invasive Species Awareness Week — and how you can help

A new invasive plant species that appears to be poised to be a terrible invasive in moist, nutrient-rich situations across eastern North America has been documented in two counties in South Carolina: fig buttercup, also called lesser celandine (Ficaria verna, formerly Ranunculus ficaria).

Because of concern that this plant may be establishing footholds along waterways in other counties, the SC Native Plant Society is enlisting the efforts of people across the state to scout areas near them during March and April. A training video can be seen at
http://scnps.org/education/citizen-science-invasive-fig-buttercup/

A workshop is also planned, to be held March 21 at Lake Conestee Nature Park in Greenville:
http://scnps.org/event/upstate-lake-conestee-nature-park-invasive-fig-buttercup

What is an invasive species? An invasive species is an introduced plant or animal with the ability to thrive and spread aggressively outside its native range, and which is believed to cause damage to the environment, human economy and/or human health.

In an effort to to raise awareness and identify solutions to invasive species issues, the week of February 22–28 has been designated as National Invasive Species Awareness Week.

Kudzu (Pueraria montana), “the plant that ate the South”, is an example that readily comes to mind. Introduced to the United States as an ornamental and heavily promoted for erosion control, it now covers about 8 million acres of land in the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service, and costs an estimated $500 million a year in the U.S. in control efforts and the damage it causes to forest productivity.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) is an invasive insect introduced to the East Coast in the 1950s, Already it has killed huge numbers of hemlocks in the Southern Appalachians, and foresters as far north as Maine are now battling the destructive pest. The hemlock is a foundational species in the riparian and cove habitats of southern mountains, and the ecological ramifications of its loss impact such things as stream flow, water temperature, and the survival of eastern brook trout.

Hydrilla (Hydrilla verticillata) is an invasive aquatic plant that was first found in Lake Marion in 1982 and now covers over 55,000 acres in the state. Indeed, Hydrilla has become a major obstacle to fishing, swimming, boating, hydroelectric generation, and irrigation in slow-moving waters from Connecticut to Texas.

A list of ways to observe National Invasive Species Awareness Week can be downloaded from the official website (www.nisaw.org). Their suggestions include “clean, drain and dry your boat trailer and gear every time you leave a body of water”, “learn to recognize common invaders and keep an eye out for signs of new ones”, “join an eradication effort”, “let your lawmakers know your opinions about the impact of invasive species on our natural heritage”, “replace your invasive landscape plants with native alternatives”, and “become a citizen scientist”.