Plant identifications?

Hi!

I just want to remind everyone that I am still available to attempt to identify any plants you may have from a digital image, here on this site. It has been slow this last year!  If you do not wish to put the image on our site, you can still send it to me privately at [email protected], and let me know if you want the answer to be private or not [you can also indicate that if you want to send it to the site].  I used to do all of them by email, and this current site was just a faster way to do it at times  – but I like to try to identify plants of most kinds on or off the site [not mushrooms, mosses, algae or other non-vascular plants, however] and you are welcome to send images to me.

I enjoy a challenge.

–Steve Hill [Ph.D Botanist]  SCNPS

 

Volunteers Needed: Sea Oat Rescue!

We will be removing approximately 1,000 plants from the footprint of the new nature trail on Sullivan’s Island and transplanting them to the newly re-engineered Folly Beach County Park.  We will begin at 9 am at Station 16 beach path on Sullivan’s Island and the first plants should arrive at Folly around 11am.  Bring shovels to both sites and pruners/scissors to Sullivan’s.  Come to either or both sites and take part in this great opportunity to help the SC Native Plant Society and our County Parks!

SeaoatFinal

Lowcountry: September 17 meeting recap

A big thank you to Billy McCord for providing an informative and entertaining talk about coastal butterflies and native plants!  After the lecture, he was even kind enough to show us how he tags monarch butterflies each fall and how that information is used to help study the migration of these special creatures.

We had a wonderful turnout for the meeting: nearly 70 people in attendance in the Citadel’s Duckett Biology Auditorium.

Here’s a few pictures from the event:

Many members and new faces came out for the first meeting of our 2013-2014 lecture series

Many members and new faces came out for the first meeting of our 2013-2014 lecture series

 

Billy McCord demonstrating how he uses a tool to help hold the monarch butterflies as he records data and tags them

Billy McCord demonstrating how he uses a tool to help hold the monarch butterflies as he records data and tags them

 

The first tagged monarch butterfly of the fall migration season!

Billy shows off the first tagged monarch butterfly of the fall migration season!

 

 

 

Lowcountry: Fall Plant Sale Information!

The Lowcountry Chapter of the SC Native Plant Society is pleased to partner with Charles Towne Landing to host our annual fall plant sale on Saturday September 28, 2013.  For information about time, location, and payment methods please see: SCNPSplantsaleflyerFall2013

To help you plan ahead, here (PlantListFall2013) is the list of grasses, trees, shrubs, vines, ferns, palms and perennials we will have available for purchase.  We’re anticipating a great crowd, so come early to shop!

 

 

 

2013 Annual Meeting

The  2013 annual meeting will be held at Saluda Shoals Park in Columbia, SC on November 16th. Rudy Mancke will be the featured speaker.  A field trip led by Rudy will follow lunch.

INVASIVE ALERT: Fig Buttercup documented in SC

jkm130409_105bFig Buttercup has recently been found in Greenville County. Never heard of it? Try Lesser Celandine. It may be in the gardening catalog on your kitchen table, promoted as an easy-to-grow alternative to the rare native Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris).

This is SC’s first documented sighting of Ficaria verna growing outside of cultivation. It is a vigorous plant that emerges in early Spring before most natives, forming a green blanket which, once established, native plants cannot penetrate. Toothworts, Dutchman’s Breeches, Trout Lily, Trillium and Bloodroot are some of the natives most at risk.

jkm130415_342jkm130415_350It produces numerous tubers and bulblets, each of which can grow into a new plant when separated from the parent by animals or well-meaning weed-pullers, or carried downstream. Its bright buttery yellow flowers were in full bloom here in early April — an infestation looking like a green carpet with yellow dots, growing in low open woods, floodplains, meadows and waste places. After flowering, its above-ground parts die back and are mostly gone by June; it survives the winter as thickened fingerlike underground stems.

jkm130409_113bThis is a very serious and challenging pest, and it is important that we do everything we can to prevent its establishing a beachhead. Its short life cycle offers very little time to attempt control.

jkm130409_186bChemical pesticides can be effective, but are best used early before natives and amphibians have emerged. Small infestations can be tackled by hand digging with a small trowel, but soil disturbance can encourage further infestation. If digging is attempted, care must be taken to bag every scrap of plant, and make sure they are completely dead before delivering to a landfill.

SCNPS_Ficaria_FactSheet_colorLearn more at our March 18th meeting,
Under the radar: Fig Buttercup
download a fact sheet,
or visit these sites:
http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/rafi1.htm ,
http://www.dcnr.state.pa.us/cs/groups/public/documents/document/dcnr_010251.pdf ,
and www.namethatplant.net/article_ficaria.shtml

To see the Greenville County infestation, which spreads along 1.5 miles of Reedy River floodplain, download Conestee~Ficaria.pdf

 

green_500x6To learn more, please watch the video at
http://scnps.org/education/citizen-science-invasive-fig-buttercup/

green_500x6